American Diplomacy, Policies and Practice

American Diplomacy, Policies and Practice

American Diplomacy, Policies and Practice

American Diplomacy, Policies and Practice

Excerpt

In the following pages the subject of American foreign relations is discussed from the point of view of political science rather than of history. The principal aim has been to describe and analyze existing policies and institutions rather than to trace the diplomatic narrative, although historical material has been used in order to prepare the proper backgrounds. No claim to finality in treatment is made. Principles arrived at regarding the changing subject of international relations at any given moment must be to some extent tentative. Subsequent discovery of additional data will necessitate a reexamination of present conclusions. Increased use of the resources and methodologies of the related social sciences will improve our understanding of the vast material and psychic forces which bear upon the problem. Thus every era will bring a fresh challenge to scholarship. The present work represents an effort to collect a considerable body of significant data upon an immensely important subject and to organize it according to principles now believed to be valid.

The obligations of the author are many and they extend over a number of years. A general expression of sincere gratitude must suffice for their recognition except in a few salient cases. The great debt to other writers in the field is only partially expressed by footnote references. Certain individuals have been of special service in directing me to sources of current information. Wallace McClure of the Department of State, whose writings on economic diplomacy are well known, was very gracious in making suggestions as to the finding of certain recent material of a technical character. William A. Manger was kind enough to throw light on several matters concerning the significant work of the Pan American Union. Benjamin Gerig and other members of the League of Nations Secretariat courteously placed me in touch with data regarding subjects of American cooperation at Geneva. Concerning the larger movements of the cycle of civilization, with which the subject of American policy should be correlated, I have had the benefit of various discussions with Arnold J. Toynbee, whose expositions of the trends of history as they affect modern international relations . . .

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