Alfred E. Smith: A Critical Study

Alfred E. Smith: A Critical Study

Alfred E. Smith: A Critical Study

Alfred E. Smith: A Critical Study

Excerpt

A FEW DAYS AFTER JUNE 1, 1923, AT WHICH TIME the nation had been theoretically dry for some four years, the white-coated host of a speakeasy down near the Manhattan end of the Brooklyn Bridge hung, with due ceremony, a large portrait of Alfred E. Smith behind his bar. Over the smiling photograph of the Governor of the State of New York he draped an American flag in rigidly artistic folds and under it tacked a neat card bearing the words:

HE MADE GOOD!

It was a tribute from the heart. For on June I the Governor, after untold mental anguish, unanimous advice to the contrary from recently acquired unofficial advisers with their eyes on the Democratic National Convention, and frenzied affirmative pressure from Tammany Hall, had finally signed a law which invalidated the State's liquor enforcement act. Approving this repealer was a duty that Al Smith would have evaded, had it been possible, with the greatest of pleasure. Already a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, he . . .

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