Labor Attitudes and Problems

Labor Attitudes and Problems

Labor Attitudes and Problems

Labor Attitudes and Problems

Excerpt

The purpose of this book is to present to students who have already obtained some slight background in the concepts and terminology of economics, a more intimate consideration of the worker in society. It is an attempt to understand the worker from an economic standpoint; what he does, how he lives, what he thinks--in brief to get at his attitudes.

The book is addressed primarily to students of the junior college. The authors believe, however, that since the mode of approach is quite different from that of the current books on "labor problems," the present work will adapt itself to the needs of various other student groups. Prospective engineers, for example, whose profession is sure to force them into the thick of the problems of capital and labor, should find the material here presented both interesting and profitable.

For, as it has been pointed out more than once, the average employer, when encountering a difficulty in material or machinery, at once turns the matter over to a group of experts for investigation; whereas, if the difficulty is with the workers, he at once assumes the attitude of warfare. Yet the need for cool understanding of the nature of the difficulty is certainly as great in the second instance as in the first.

And what is more to the point, the worker's opinions can not be simply controlled. The direction of our social and industrial development always represents a resultant of conflicting forces, and among these forces the aspirations of the worker exert a constantly increasing influence. The authors of the present text assume that every citizen of a democracy is called upon to bear his part in adapting our institutions to the bewildering changes of our social and industrial system, and that an intelligent appreciation of the attitude of the worker will enable us to substitute, in some measure, wise co-operation for wasteful conflict.

It will be apparent that this approach frankly assumes the influence of environmental factors upon human opinions, motives, and actions. Whatever theories we may hold in regard . . .

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