The Springfield Plan

The Springfield Plan

The Springfield Plan

The Springfield Plan

Excerpt

Americans have always liked progress. In part because progress was essential to survival during our hazardous early history. In part because the kind of people who risked pioneering and who overcame its hardships and dangers were, of necessity, progressive. They and their children of many faiths and races have respected progress--progress in clearing the wilderness, progress in inventing machines to form the land or build the cities, progress in scientific knowledge and social engineering, progress in improving the conditions of life.

Especially when difficulties multiplied and new problems arose, Americans have admired the men and women who faced and met and solved them. Moreover, this admiration has been far from passive. Again and again, it took the form of emulation and adoption, of adaptation and improvement--and thus led to further progress.

This fact of American history and character gives hope that we shall resolve the present crisis of our democracy, that we shall find ways and means to maintain our democratic mood and way of life under the stress of growing anti-democratic pressures.

A definition is in order here: Democracy is people--living together as equals.

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