Austro-German Diplomatic Relations, 1908-1914

Austro-German Diplomatic Relations, 1908-1914

Austro-German Diplomatic Relations, 1908-1914

Austro-German Diplomatic Relations, 1908-1914

Excerpt

As the World War is receding farther and farther into the background, and it is gradually becoming apparent that the solution reached at Versailles is not beyond criticism, it is also becoming increasingly evident that there may have been issues which have been at least partially overlooked. It seems to me that this is particularly true of Central Europe and that the Austro-German alliance concealed several such issues.

It is the aim of this study to subject this alliance to the criticism of the post-war point of view in the hope of achieving a clearer understanding of the problem of Central Europe, a problem which is neither a German nor an Austrian problem but a Central European one. The six years preceding the outbreak of the World War seem to offer an exceptional opportunity in this respect, since these years had to stand the test of how far Central Europe had overcome its inherent difficulties. Beginning with the annexation crisis of 1908, the obscurity surrounding the Austro-German relationship, the lack of real purpose underlying it, resulted in European statesmen evaluating it incorrectly. This, in turn, affected the temper of European diplomacy adversely and was not without influence in increasing the distrust in which Germany was held.

For the use of the German newspapers I am indebted to the Widener Library of Harvard University. Practically all other materials were in the Hoover War Library at Stanford University. I take this opportunity to acknowledge the unfailing courtesy and help of the staffs of both the Widener Library and the Hoover War Library. In addition, I consulted pamphlet materials in Vienna. Comparatively few references to these have been made, however, as this appeared unnecessary. My references, moreover, to the great documentary collections are usually to the document, unless otherwise stated.

The study was originally presented as a dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Stanford University, having been written under the very helpful direction of the late Professor . . .

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