The Collapse of Central Europe

The Collapse of Central Europe

The Collapse of Central Europe

The Collapse of Central Europe

Excerpt

Dr. Nowak has written a very brilliant book. It is one of a series which he has now given to the world. In the present volume he has furnished a picture, vividly fashioned, of the break-down under the stress of the great war of the Austrian Empire, and of that of Germany also. Nowhere else that I know of has the story been told so strikingly. With great command of material he has made the statesmen who did their best but failed to save the situation tell of their plans, in many cases in their own words. We have put before us the views of Czernin, of von Kühlmann, of Ludendorff, as well as those of the Emperor Charles.

The narrative is profoundly interesting. We learn the tremendous character of the influence which the sense of nationality exercised especially under the stimulus of the declarations of the late President Wilson. The book tells also of the growing strain which this produced on the resources and efforts of the generals charged with the leadership of the various armies. Not the least interesting of the accounts given is that of the great effort made in Albania by General Pflanzer-Baltin. Few military leaders have had a more difficult task, and the wonderful thing is, that he saved so much of his army from destruction.

But the greatest interest of the volume lies in the history, taken as a whole, of the period it covers. The war gradually developed, so far as concerned Germany and Austria. With whatever motives these nations entered into it, the war they . . .

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