International Migrations: The Immigrant in the Modern World

International Migrations: The Immigrant in the Modern World

International Migrations: The Immigrant in the Modern World

International Migrations: The Immigrant in the Modern World

Excerpt

In this book we have attempted a comprehensive, up-to-date treatment of human migration from the international point of view. In the years preceding World War II there was a waning of interest in the old questions associated with immigration to the United States. It was felt, without full reason, that the domestic problems growing out of the influx from abroad had been adequately solved with the passage of time and the establishment of an apparently permanent policy of immigration restriction. But recent events have made it clear that migration is a world problem, and that its significance for Americans lies in this fact. Thus the present volume is much more than a revision of Human Migration, written by the senior author and published in 1935. It is designed to meet the need for a treatment of the movements of men as processes world wide in scope and closely related to other still larger processes and problems.

Our first task has been to analyze human migration in terms of the social processes involved in it. To appreciate the significance of migratory movements one must see the accomplishments and failures of men in their totality. Part I of this book is therefore devoted to a general description of the major factors influencing migration--the growth of populations, the development of economies, the conflict of economic interests, the evolution and interaction of national and subgroup cultures, and the political rivalries leading to war and the threat of war.

This theoretical foundation once set, there follows in Part II an analysis of world migratory movements from World War I to the present day. An account of European migration between the wars illustrates the attempts at bilateral and multilateral agreements, and the first strivings toward international control of migration. We have been at pains to point out the change that came over migratory movements with the rise of totalitarianism and total war, with the refugee replacing the voluntary migrant, and with migration becoming increasingly a compulsory, state-controlled movements of large masses. This is pointed up by a description of the attempts at resettlement of the European displaced person after World War II. But our treatment is not confined to migratory movements centering on Europe. We have tried to give a balanced account of migration in Asia and Africa, and have given special attention to the establishment and growth of Israel--a state almost literally created by migration.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.