Scott Joplin

Scott Joplin

Scott Joplin

Scott Joplin

Excerpt

In the middle of the nineteenth century, the Republic of Texas was an anomaly, a transition area between the established South and the frontier West. Much of western and northern Texas was wilderness, piney woods and swamplands where Indian tribes lived undisturbed by the scattered squatters and hunters whose connections to civilization were remote and whose allegiance was to themselves alone. East Texas, though more populous, still had about it a wild and woolly frontier flavor. In these days before statehood it was a haven for persons fleeing the laws of neighboring states. But though it lacked civility, it abounded in opportunity, a wide open area, ripe for enterprising men from older, more established regions where the land had already been cleared, the class system installed, a man's opportunities somewhat circumscribed. For the ambitious Southern farmer East Texas was the new frontier, lacking the laws that prevented expansion and the customs that limited unabashed ambition, but in . . .

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