Modern Problems in the Ancient World

Modern Problems in the Ancient World

Modern Problems in the Ancient World

Modern Problems in the Ancient World

Excerpt

There is an old saying that history repeats itself, and, like most such sayings, this one is both true and false. From the earliest times men have been confronted by the same fundamental problems and have sought to solve them in much the same ways. In a sense, therefore, history has continually repeated itself from the beginning. The repetition, however, has never been exact. The fundamental problems may have been the same, but they have never presented themselves twice under exactly the same conditions. Unemployment on a scale such that something had to be done about it is nothing new in human experience, and the number of remedies which could be contrived is so limited that the same methods of dealing with the problem have been tried over and over again. Yet the circumstances under which the problem arose and under which the solution of it was attempted have never precisely duplicated themselves. While, therefore, history has many valuable lessons to teach, they are not to be learned by a rapid glance at the outward course of events. We cannot hastily conclude that because a certain remedy failed to solve some problem in the past it will necessarily fail in the present. We must first determine precisely why the remedy failed in the past and then examine present conditions to see whether the causes of failure are still at work, whether they are as potent as they once were, and whether any new factors exist which may affect the result. It is only by serious and careful study that history can be made to serve as a useful guide to human conduct.

These considerations are perhaps somewhat trite and obvious, but they have an application to the present work. The author . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.