The Real Founders of New England: Stories of Their Life along the Coast, 1602-1628

The Real Founders of New England: Stories of Their Life along the Coast, 1602-1628

The Real Founders of New England: Stories of Their Life along the Coast, 1602-1628

The Real Founders of New England: Stories of Their Life along the Coast, 1602-1628

Excerpt

The reader of works relating to New England history soon discovers that the period between the voyage of Gosnold in 1602 and the coming of the Puritans in 1628 and 1630 is passed over with very little more than a reference to two or three of the chief explorers. The material for this period, except for Plymouth, proves to be very meagre. But there is something of fact and romance in these years that may still be recorded.

While it is no longer fashionable to try to divide history into sections, the bounds of which are set by the accidents of war, or by the coming and going of rulers, it is, however, still the vogue, I fear, to assert that History began, as far as New England is concerned, either in 1620 at Plymouth or in 1630 at Boston. The record, whether Indian or English, should, it seems to me, be looked upon as a continuous inter-relation of events. Governor Bradford in August, 1627, stated that the subjects of Queen Elizabeth began to navigate and plant in these lands "well nigh forty years ago." Those who are so constituted that they must begin history with a date might well choose 1587 as a convenient starting point for our story.

These pages (Chapter II) were begun in St. Ives, Cornwall, as I sat looking out upon the fishing boats drawn up along the edge of the quaint gray harbor . . .

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