Elizabeth Bowen

Elizabeth Bowen

Elizabeth Bowen

Elizabeth Bowen

Excerpt

Elizabeth Bowen has often been called a novelist of 'sensibility', a term which, if it means anything at all, is apt too often to imply the exploitation of the writer's own particular temperament at the expense of those other qualities which go to the making of a good novelist. To apply this designation to Miss Bowen is to underestimate, by implication, the breadth of her talent; and she has herself, as it happens (in a broadcast discussion of her work), specifically denied the impeachment. To her, as a writer, sensibility in itself is 'neither here nor there', and it has never been her wish either to 'generate' sensibility for its own sake, or to 'play upon it'. Sensibility is, rather, a kind of medium through which the world can be apprehended more clearly and significantly, just as the features of a landscape will stand out more sharply when seen in a particular kind of light. In other words, Miss Bowen uses her sensibility (which is without question exquisite) as an instrument, merely, for producing the particular effects at which she is aiming in her novels and stories.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.