My Brother's Face

My Brother's Face

My Brother's Face

My Brother's Face

Excerpt

This book deals with the India of to-day from an Indian's standpoint. Thus, for example, I have not essayed the task of seeing the Amritsar shootings through the eyes of a General Dyer. I do not know what the English observer of India thinks and wants to think of this and other controversial matters. Because I am thoroughly convinced that I cannot present his view-point, I have written what my brother Indians had to say, hoping that the views of Englishmen in India would be set down by English writers. Let us anticipate that the reader will study both in order to wrest the inwardness of the Indian problem from the battling contradictions with which it is beset. There are as many Indian problems as there are eyes to see them. And probably there are just as many solutions for them. But let us not forget that by regarding each and every fact of this gem--the India of to-day --we shall be able to discern in some measure what the India of to-morrow may become. The future alone matters. The past is closed; the present is closing, but the ever open door of the future holds in store for men surprises more startling than they can conceive. The power is given to men to build to-morrow better than to-day.

This book presents the views of Indians who are anxious for the future of India. They are--every one of them--troubled by the changes that are being wrought there. But in their thought, speech, and . . .

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