The Bunkhouse Man: A Study of Work and Pay in the Camps of Canada, 1903-1914

The Bunkhouse Man: A Study of Work and Pay in the Camps of Canada, 1903-1914

The Bunkhouse Man: A Study of Work and Pay in the Camps of Canada, 1903-1914

The Bunkhouse Man: A Study of Work and Pay in the Camps of Canada, 1903-1914

Excerpt

For twenty-four years the writer of this brochure has had practical experience with the work and pay of men in frontier places across Canada. In 1904 he first went to the camps as a bushman on the North Shore. He was one of the earliest instructors of the Frontier College, then shortly started by Alfred Fitzpatrick, B.A., and slowly taking shape. With different phases of this work, particularly with those pertaining to bunkhouse men, he has since been closely associated.

Previous to 1904 the writer had never seen the inside of a sleep camp. After five years' experience as a teacher in a school in Culross Township, Bruce County, Ontario, supplemented by a broken course of two years in University studies, he undertook manual labour in camps combined with educational work among the men. His motive, if he had any particular incentive at the time for acting as an instructor, was the bald appeal of a new endeavour and the further challenge to any innate patriotism to serve in this way as a preceptor among the men of the bunkhouse rather than as a teacher following the more regular routine of the class room.

To be an instructor involves bringing opportunities of education in a practical way to the man at his work. During the day the instructor is engaged in manual labour, whether as a lumberjack, a miner or a navvy, in some isolated camp; in the evenings he conducts classes or is other-

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