Mediaeval Drama in Chester

Mediaeval Drama in Chester

Mediaeval Drama in Chester

Mediaeval Drama in Chester

Excerpt

"MEDIAEVAL DRAMA IN CHESTER" may seem an inaccurate title for lectures which actually reach the seventeenth century; but it is the type of drama, rather than the period, that is in question.

These lectures represent, I trust, only a part of my "late harvest"--if I may use the title of one of the books of a Canadian professor by me deeply beloved, Archibald MacMechan. He was to me what his friend, W. J. Alexander, must also have been to many--a beginning. When I first became interested in mediaeval drama, however, I did so under the tutelage of John Matthews Manly who had, of all the men I have personally known, the soundest and most brilliant intellect. He was the soul of kindness, as Miss Rickert, his long associate, was an infinitude of charm and inspiration. Through these persons, and through C. R. Baskervill whose memory was encyclopaedic and amazing, and whose slow and genial smile it was a joy to provoke, I once walked--in Rupert Brooke's fine phrase--"proudly friended." And through them all in their variety of still-living influence, I can understand what Professor Alexander must have meant to his colleagues at Toronto and to generations of students.

With these names I should like to associate that of Sir W. W. Greg. He represents to me, and long has done, not only exact and far-reaching and voluminous scholarship, and not only hospitality and a helping hand to the stranger within the gates, but Magnanimity, the last and greatest of the Twelve Moral Virtues.

Over the many years, I have received courtesies and help . . .

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