A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently

A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently

A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently

A Geography of Time: The Temporal Misadventures of a Social Psychologist, or How Every Culture Keeps Time Just a Little Bit Differently

Synopsis

The concept of time is relative and flexible, says celebrated scholar Robert Levine. He points out that a culture's sense of time has profound consequences for an individual's psychological, physical and emotional well-being. Traveling around the globe, in both past and present times, Levine describes "clock time" in opposition to both "nature time" -- the rhythm of the sun and the seasons -- and "event time" -- the structuring of time around happenings. He argues that by learning to embrace these three different perceptions of time, by developing a "multitemporal" approach, one can enjoy a more flexible and rewarding life. Written in a charming and graceful prose style and filled with lively anecdotes, A Geography of Time is one of those rare books that compels readers to re-evaluate their perspective on everyday life.

Excerpt

Every culture has its own unique set of temporal fingerprints. To know a people is to know the time values they live by.

Jeremy rifkin, Time Wars

Time has intrigued me for as long as I remember. Like most young Americans, I was initially taught that time is simply measured by a clock--in seconds and minutes, hours and days, months and years. But when I looked around at my elders, the numbers never seemed to add up the same way twice. Why was it, I wondered, that some adults appeared to be perpetually running out of daylight hours while others seemed to have all the time in the world? I thought of this second group of people--the ones who would go to the movies in the middle of the workday or take their families on six-month sabbaticals to the South Pacific--as temporal millionaires, and I vowed to become one of them.

When planning my career, I ignored my peers' unwavering concern with the amount of money a job would pay and tuned in instead to the temporal lifestyle it offered. To what extent would I be . . .

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