Being and Becoming: A Critique of Post-Modernism

Being and Becoming: A Critique of Post-Modernism

Being and Becoming: A Critique of Post-Modernism

Being and Becoming: A Critique of Post-Modernism

Synopsis

Contemporary society, according to Centore, is dominated by a post-modern philosophical world-view. Lacking until now, from the many works that have been written on post-modernism, is one that scrutinizes its fundamental assumptions and presuppositions. Being and Becoming attempts to fill this need by synthesizing the key developments in contemporary post-modernism. By taking the reader through the various historical periods and developments which have led to the current situation, Centore shows what is now taken for granted by the vast majority of people is not necessary for either philosophical or theological reasons.

Excerpt

Everyone by nature loves trying to solve a mystery. Philosophy marks the height of this general rule of human nature. The most interesting problems and puzzles in philosophy are those concerned with reconciling apparently irreconcilable opposites, such as stability/flux, reality/appearance, sameness/difference, eternity/time, universal/particular, absolute/relative, substance/accident, subject/ object, determinism/freedom, discipline/creativity, hierarchy/democracy, individual/group, security/adventure, intimacy/substantiality, faith/reason, mysticism/ordinary life, and the like.

Over the centuries these problems have evoked a second order of dichotomies and conflicts, this time between and among competing theories which are designed to resolve the first order puzzles. Some of these competing theories are realism/idealism, essentialism/existentialism, theism/atheism, theocentrism/anthropocentrism, absolutism/libertarianism, capitalism/communism, and so forth. Even today there seems to be no end to these philosophical debates. There is, nonetheless, progress in philosophy, which can be measured by the degree to which contemporary thinkers have at their disposal, thanks to the work of their predecessors, a more comprehensive view of the various possible alternatives for resolving the first order problems, as well as a history of what has actually happened when certain views are put into practice.

The purpose of this study is to look into this nest of problems more deeply, and ultimately to resolve, in principle at least, all of the paradoxes and puzzles on the basis of an old insight into the nature of reality. It is not a defense of classical philosophy in general, after the fashion of Leo Strauss. Neither is it an attempt to go back and live in the past. Such a thing is not even possible. It is possible, though, to apply to the present certain principles which, because they are so fundamental to the human condition, possess a timeless element about them.

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