The Soviet Standard of Living: Social Benefits

The Soviet Standard of Living: Social Benefits

The Soviet Standard of Living: Social Benefits

The Soviet Standard of Living: Social Benefits

Excerpt

In the Soviet Union concern for human welfare has ceased to be one's own private affair; it is a collective matter assisted by the state which has made it the cornerstone of its policy. No longer is it each man for himself as it was in tsarist Russia before when egoism, envy and rivalry corroded social life.

The Socialist Revolution placed the means of production in the hands of the working people and did away with the exploitation of man by man. As a result the working people--the workers, peasants and intellectuals--came to enjoy the whole of the national income--about three-quarters--is spent to satisfy directly their personal material and cultural requirements. The remainder, which also belongs to the working people, is used by society to advance the socialist economy and culture and to expand production--in other words, also in the interests of the entire people.

The fundamental economic and political transformations wrought by the Soviet system brought into being a new type of relation that had never existed before among people and between people and the state. By abolishing unemployment, poverty and want, and by eliminating all national, racial and sexual discrimination, the Soviet state opened up unlimited opportunities for the development of the individual. The principles of socialist humanism, of profound concern for man, of fraternal relations between the people have become the salient features of Soviet society, and of the activity of the state.

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