The Making of Men

The Making of Men

The Making of Men

The Making of Men

Excerpt

I have taught for some thirty-five years. But I am not sure when I have been most successful or effective, and when I have failed to achieve even a minimal desirable result. Neither student nor colleague, with rare exceptions, does much to help the teacher know himself as he is known. I cannot, then, with any confidence draw upon my own experiences or the experiences of others for knowledge, guidance, or principles relevant to educational theory. But over the course of this same period I have reflected a good deal about the nature of reality and the fundamental concepts which govern knowledge and action. I have given considerable thought to the foundations of ethics and the proper end of man. It is to these I have looked to help me find my way through that pervasive and yet almost ungraspable process we call education.

I have rewritten the entire book a number of times, in part to meet the penetrating criticisms of Vernon Sternberg, publisher and friend, and of Richard Sewall, colleague and friend. I am not entirely satisfied with it yet, but I think there is little that I now can do to improve it.

P. W.

New Haven, Conn. January, 1966 . . .

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