Men and Brothers: Anglo-American Antislavery Cooperation

Men and Brothers: Anglo-American Antislavery Cooperation

Men and Brothers: Anglo-American Antislavery Cooperation

Men and Brothers: Anglo-American Antislavery Cooperation

Excerpt

Much has been written on both the British and the American antislavery movements, but hitherto they have been treated as separate developments. It is the thesis of this book that the struggles in Great Britain and the United States against slavery and the slave trade were so closely connected that they deserve to be studied together. Sometimes they ran parallel, as was generally true until the 1820s, but by the 1830s and 1840s they became so intertwined that they can scarcely be untangled from one another.

My first interest in this subject was aroused by the lectures of Professor Dwight L. Dumond at the University of Michigan, in which he suggested that British influence on the American anti- slavery movement needed to be investigated, and was further stimulated by my reading of Gilbert H. Barnes and Frank J. Klingberg especially, who dealt with specific aspects of that influence. Although this study originally began with the turbulent decade of the 1830s, it quickly became apparent that it was necessary to move backward as well as forward in time to see the complete picture of Anglo-American cooperation. Before I was through, I had pushed its origins back into the seventeenth century. The study ends with the American Civil War and legal emancipation in the United States, but I do not mean to imply that the Anglo- American connection then ceased to exist. Those same people who . . .

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