Macropolitics: Selected Essays on the Philosophy and Science of Politics

Macropolitics: Selected Essays on the Philosophy and Science of Politics

Macropolitics: Selected Essays on the Philosophy and Science of Politics

Macropolitics: Selected Essays on the Philosophy and Science of Politics

Excerpt

When the idea of publishing a group of my essays in book form first arose, it had only a limited interest for me. As I thought about the project, the idea of composing an introductory essay in which I sketched some philosophical ideas underlying my thought arose and enthusiasm began to develop. I have believed for a long time that social scientists take too narrow a view of scientific method, that the implications of a scientific philosophy for value theory are ordinarily misconceived, and that these misconceptions are relevant both to political science and political philosophy.

Although I am neither a professional philosopher nor an expert on the philosophy of science, the essay that follows has obvious relevance and great importance for some issues of political science.

We cannot ignore the philosophical foundations of many issues in political science, hoping that the issues will go away or that others will solve them for us. If the essay is something less than the full-length and detailed treatment that might be desired, it nonetheless I hope raises the right issues and adumbrates some of the answers.

The philosophical essay that opens this book combines two strands of thought: a philosophical pragmaticism related to positions developed by Charles Sanders Peirce, and the type of systems theory that evolved . . .

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