Latin American Issues: Essays and Comments

Latin American Issues: Essays and Comments

Latin American Issues: Essays and Comments

Latin American Issues: Essays and Comments

Excerpt

We have frequently been told over the past two years or so that the United States has "neglected" Latin America in the post-war period. The meaning generally given to this term is that Latin America has not shared equitably in the bounty of grants and loans which has flowed from our shores to numerous countries in Western Europe and Asia. But neglect has been Latin America's lot in a perhaps more fundamental sense: over the past years little fresh effort has been taken on our part to understand Latin America, to explore its economic, social and political problems, to begin a dialogue with its intellectuals and social scientists.

Desirous to make a modest contribution in this field, the Twentieth Century Fund organized a Latin American study group which held a number of sessions during the winter and spring of 1959-60. The group set itself the task of exploring present Latin American attitudes toward the principal economic problems that are being encountered in the area. Its members were drawn from universities and Washington agencies. Ordinarily economists, who constituted a majority of the participants, have a strong urge to sit as judges or to act as cure-prescribing doctors. But they were earnestly asked to repress this urge; for the task that the group undertook was to identify the reasons for which Latin Americans advocate, adopt and change certain economic policies, and thus to throw some light on the policy-making process. This emphasis on exploring what was called the "Latin American style" was suggested by Albert Hirschman, rapporteur of the group, who is now at work on an extended study of economic policy-making in Latin America for the Twentieth Century Fund.

With the exception of Dr. Carroll's paper on land reform, the papers which are brought together in this volume were contributed in the course of or as a result of the discussions of the study group. It will be apparent that some have retained their original informal character, while others have been considerably expanded and refined. When controversy arose, discussion papers were in- . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.