Cane Fires: The Anti-Japanese Movement in Hawaii, 1865-1945

Cane Fires: The Anti-Japanese Movement in Hawaii, 1865-1945

Cane Fires: The Anti-Japanese Movement in Hawaii, 1865-1945

Cane Fires: The Anti-Japanese Movement in Hawaii, 1865-1945

Synopsis

Outstanding Book in History and Social Science Award, Association for Asian American Studies, 1992Okihiro's account is an important corrective to our understanding of the Japanese American Experience in World War II. --The Hawaiian Journal of History
Challenging the prevailing view of Hawaii as a mythical racial paradise, Gary Okihiro presents this history of a systematic anti-Japanese movement in the islands from the time migrant workers were brought to the sugar cane fields until the end of World War II. He demonstrates that the racial discrimination against Japanese Americans that occurred on the West Coast during the second World War closely paralleled the less familiar oppression of Hawaii's Japanese, which evolved from the production needs of the sugar planters to the military's concern over the menace of alien domination. Okihiro convincingly argues that those concerns motivated the consolidation of the plantation owners, the Territorial government, and the U.S. military-Hawaii's elite-into a single force that propelled the anti-Japanese movement, while the military devised secret plans for martial law and the removal and detention of Japanese Americans in Hawaii two decades before World War II.
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