Truth and Reality in Marx and Hegel: A Reassessment

Truth and Reality in Marx and Hegel: A Reassessment

Truth and Reality in Marx and Hegel: A Reassessment

Truth and Reality in Marx and Hegel: A Reassessment

Excerpt

Sidney Hook once wrote that to join the names of Hegel and Marx is not so much to express a plain relationship as "to raise a problem -- one of the most challenging problems in the history of thought" ; affinities between them seem to go hand in hand with polar oppositions. Hook is most vividly interested in the following formulation of the problem: "How did there develop from what was ostensibly the most conservative system of philosophy in western European tradition, the revolutionary ideology of the greatest mass movement since Christianity?" The same problem has found some other formulations as well. Such questions were raised as, for instance, what could these two philosophies have had in common, since one (Hegel's) was viewed as more speculative and abstract than any other philosophy, the other (Marx's) as distinctly concrete-materialist? ; or, what was the common ground of these two doctrines one of which (Hegel's) aimed merely at an interpretation or understanding of what is, while the other (Marx's) aimed at a radical change of the existing world?

This study is an attempt at a new examination of the relationship between the two philosophies. The examination of the historical sequence and theoretical connection between Hegelianism and Marxism focuses on their respective approaches to the philosophically and practically fundamental question of truth. The results of this examination allow one to formulate the central problem more precisely, as well as to outline possible solutions to that problem.

The main sources of this study are Hegel's writings dealing . . .

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