Freedom and the University

Freedom and the University

Freedom and the University

Freedom and the University

Excerpt

These essays were originally presented -- during the spring of 1949 -- as lectures in the third part of the Cornell Symposium on "America's Freedom and Responsibility in the Contemporary Crisis." This Symposium had grown out of widespread discussion, both formal and informal, within the Cornell community, on the nature and extent of the responsibility of universities for the maintenance of the American way of life.

From these discussions some general points of agreement seemed to emerge: that it was not the proper function of the university to indoctrinate its students in any specific political or social formula; that no one discipline or body of material as represented by a faculty department could fulfill the university's obligation to the society in which it flourished; that not only was there no simple formula for social salvation, but that there was no reason to suppose that the university could provide one through a more intensive application of its techniques of research.

Among these negative propositions there emerged the one positive conclusion that the characteristic element of the American way of life was identical with the central principle of the university tradition: the freedom of disciplined minds to use critically and impartially all relevant evidence toward the solution of human prob-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.