The Guns at Gettysburg

The Guns at Gettysburg

The Guns at Gettysburg

The Guns at Gettysburg

Excerpt

My Sound of the Guns, the Story of American Artillery from the Ancient and Honorable Company to the Atom Cannon and Guided Missile, because of its scope could allot only part of a chapter to the guns at Gettysburg. It had not long been written before I was impelled to turn to another book entirely devoted to the heroic and critical parts played by the gunners of the Union and the Confederacy on those three July days of 1863.

Artillery in the famous battle had been largely neglected, it seemed to me, as it had to a battery officer who fought there. Gettysburg, wrote Lieutenant Colonel Tully McCrea, "has been discussed from every point of view except that of the artillery, yet every account of the battle refers to the effectiveness of the arm. Scarcely any of them omit to mention the distinguished part which it performed, but how this was brought about, and wherein the management of the batteries differed from that of Chancellorsville or other preceding battles, has been passed by as a mere tactical or administrative detail, overshadowed by the magnitude of the conflict as a whole."

There are such notable exceptions as the treatment of the Confederate artillery in Wise The Long Arm of Lee, which assigns four chapters to Gettysburg and contains excellent material on the gunners of the South. Colonel Wise's work was inspired by the same inattention to the arm which animated my book. "The reports of the various commanders engaged in the war are generally vague on . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.