Africa's Wars and Prospects for Peace

Africa's Wars and Prospects for Peace

Africa's Wars and Prospects for Peace

Africa's Wars and Prospects for Peace

Synopsis

Examining the problem of war in Africa, this book opens with a review of the costs that war has imposed on Africa and its people. The second chapter provides a brief descriptive survey of Africa's wars, with emphasis on the period since 1980, as a means of providing basic information to the general reader. The next two chapters are devoted to explaining Africa's wars, with Chapter 3 concentrating on domestic factors and Chapter 4 on the international dimension. The fifth chapter attempts to weigh the prospects for peace and war in Africa over the next few years, particularly in light of major changes now affecting African countries and the international system. Finally, the last chapter suggests ways in which the international community might try to influence Africa in the direction of greater peace.

Excerpt

Africa, throughout the post-independence period, has been afflicted by war. in the 1960s, major conflicts took place in the Congo, now Zaire; Nigeria; and Sudan. Estimates of the number killed in Nigeria alone run as high as one million. the 1970s saw war come to Ethiopia, to colonial Angola and Mozambique, to white-ruled Rhodesia, and to Western Sahara. in 1979, Tanzanian troops and exiled Ugandan opposition forces invaded Uganda to bring an end to the brutal dictatorship of Idi Amin.

The 1980s, a principal focus of this book, were a decade of war over much of Africa. Seven independent countries, including some of Africa's largest nations with the greatest development potential, were seriously affected by war for years--in some cases the entire decade. These included four countries that were already at war as the decade opened: Angola, Ethiopia, Mozambique, and Chad; and two--Sudan and Uganda--that fell into renewed violence as the decade advanced. a festering conflict also began in Somalia and worsened as the decade came to an end. Wars also continued in the non-independent territories of Western Sahara and Namibia.

The 1990s opened amid hopes for a more peaceful era in Africa. the successful implementation of a 1988 regional peace accord in southwestern Africa, the 1991 Angolan internal settlement, the nearly simultaneous rebel victory in Ethiopia, and evident progress in negotiations in other conflicts encouraged these hopes. the Mozambican war finally came to an end with the signing of a peace accord in October 1992.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.