From Moorepark to "Wine Alley": The Rise and Fall of a Glasgow Housing Scheme

From Moorepark to "Wine Alley": The Rise and Fall of a Glasgow Housing Scheme

From Moorepark to "Wine Alley": The Rise and Fall of a Glasgow Housing Scheme

From Moorepark to "Wine Alley": The Rise and Fall of a Glasgow Housing Scheme

Excerpt

Some people are bound to want to know why there has been a delay of some seventeen years since my original research in the Glasgow housing scheme known as 'Wine Alley', and the production of this book. There are several reasons for this. Firstly, in a real sense, the research has been going on ever since. A Marxist critique of my 1974 article on the scheme by my colleague and friend Dave Byrne prompted me to re-examine my then reliance on labelling theory to explain the phenomenon of the scheme's 'bad' reputation. I subsequently tried to develop a more rigourous analysis, and this led to a re-investigation of the phenomenon. I concluded that it could only be explained by theorising the class basis of housing legislation, finance, construction, management, and allocation. This in turn led to the discovery that there had been intense and widespread class struggle over the state's provision of housing for the working class on Clydeside from as early as 1885. Indeed much of my subsequent research has been into local class struggles over housing. As it became clear to me that the move to a new council house was a major life experience for Glasgow's working class, this research expanded into an overall social history of such housing. I am currently involved in an historical project on the city's housing schemes with ESRC funding. This book is a contribution to such a history.

Secondly, my 1974 article has proved enduringly popular with students, and has now been reprinted twice. As I trust this book demonstrates, I had a lot more material than was contained in that piece, and have subsequently accumulated a lot more. However, at the same time I wrote this article, I was worried about the politics and ethics of sociological intervention in working-class life generally, and my own intervention in 'Wine Alley' in particular. I still am. But colleagues such as Dave Byrne, Brian Elliott, Dave McCrone and Dave Morgan have always encouraged me to publish and be damned: I hope they now feel this encouragement is justified!

Thirdly, to my knowledge, there has never been a detailed history of a Scottish inter-war housing scheme published, a curious omission given the contemporary salience of the 'Out of the Slums' campaign. For that matter, I do not know of one class analysis of a housing scheme anywhere in Britain. So this study could serve as a case-study of what was, in fact, a national phenomenon, and one which, in its day, was a major . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.