Matthew: Apostle and Evangelist

Matthew: Apostle and Evangelist

Matthew: Apostle and Evangelist

Matthew: Apostle and Evangelist

Excerpt

Our generation has witnessed a notably increased appreciation of Matthew as the greatest of the first-century gospels, along with a very general abandonment of its authenticity as the work of the apostle whose name it bears. In fact, it is very hard for us to think of anybody really equal to writing the Gospel of Matthew. We are faced with this paradox: As Matthew has gone up in favor and esteem, it has declined in authenticity as an apostolic writing. We have, in effect, been driven by its very excellence to feel that it is too good for any one of those twelve Galilean disciples to have written.

This is in part due to the more realistic modern approach to the apostles. As we view them in the gospels, they impress us as a very ordinary group of Galilean working people, though not quite peasants; for Simon and Andrew and the sons of Zebedee, with their boats and employees, must have made up quite a concern. They sold their fish to the drying plants at Tarichea, across the lake, which took its name from that industry. ( Tarichos means . . .

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