Curzon: the Last Phase, 1919-1925: A Study in Post-War Diplomacy

Curzon: the Last Phase, 1919-1925: A Study in Post-War Diplomacy

Curzon: the Last Phase, 1919-1925: A Study in Post-War Diplomacy

Curzon: the Last Phase, 1919-1925: A Study in Post-War Diplomacy

Excerpt

November 11, 1918 The Allied victory--Effect of this on Curzon's faith and temperament-- Curzon as aristocrat and bourgeois--Examination of influence of his childhood and earlier life--His late Victorian attitude of mind--His spinal illness and resultant spiritual rigidity--Nature of his imperialism--Absorbed at Eton--Its emotional and subjective aspects--Its more serious aspects, 'responsibility', 'duty', 'sacrifice'--As ex- emplified during his Viceroyalty--Curzon's temperament--His gifts-- His deficient sense of proportion--Light this throws upon his inconsistencies--His competitive and controversial instincts--His inability to delegate work or disregard detail--His unwillingness to resign--Causes of this--Humiliation of his position as Foreign Secretary--The War and his position in the War Cabinet--His fears and ambitions.

THE House of Lords assembled on the afternoon of Monday, November 18, 1918.

The purpose of their meeting was to celebrate the victory of the Allied Powers and to congratulate the Crown upon the surrender of the German Empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire and the Kingdom of Bulgaria.

Lord Curzon, as spokesman of the second Coalition Government, moved the address.

'My Lords', he said, 'I now rise to make the second motion that stands in my name upon the paper. It runs as follows:

That a humble address be presented to His Majesty to congratulate His Majesty on the conclusion of an Armistice and on the prospects of a victorious peace.'

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