Education for Public Administration: Graduate Preparation in the Social Sciences at American Universities

Education for Public Administration: Graduate Preparation in the Social Sciences at American Universities

Education for Public Administration: Graduate Preparation in the Social Sciences at American Universities

Education for Public Administration: Graduate Preparation in the Social Sciences at American Universities

Excerpt

In a list of "Colleges Offering Programs of Educational Preparation for Public Administration," published in The Municipal Year Book, 1937, sixty programs were reported: although the oldest had been initiated in 1888, it was noteworthy that of the sixty programs reported, thirty-six had been instituted within the previous nine years, seventeen since 1935. In 1937 seventy-one additional colleges reported that they offered at least a course in public administration: of these, fifty-eight had been initiated within the previous nine years, thirty-five since 1935. By 1941 the numbers had grown so that seventy-three colleges or universities professed to offer a major, a curriculum, a special program--something more than a course useful alike to citizen and prospective administrator; ninety-nine other institutions offered at least a course.

Here, then, was a trend of the last fifteen years of great importance in the development of public administration in the United States, and as part of a series of reviews of significant trends in the field (including, for example, the growth of city manager government) the Committee on Public Administration in 1937-38 undertook to sponsor a survey of university education for public administration. The survey was limited to training for general administration--excluding education for professions commonly practiced in the public service, such as social work, public health, or law; and it was limited to education through the social sciences--excluding, therefore, training through engineering schools or schools of forestry. It was limited, too, to education of college level or beyond, excluding much excellent work in vocational education for public service careers, some of it carried on under collegiate auspices.

During the academic year 1938-39 under the auspices of the Committee on Public Administration Mr. George A. Graham of Princeton University visited over twenty colleges to observe their programs at first hand, to talk with teachers, students, administrative officers, and members of other faculties, to observe teaching methods and educational facilities. In addition, he interviewed public officials who had employed graduates of these schools and graduates, not only in the neighborhood of the schools, but in centers like the national capital, and wherever such groups congregated at conventions and professional meetings. Among . . .

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