Word Recognition in Beginning Literacy

Word Recognition in Beginning Literacy

Word Recognition in Beginning Literacy

Word Recognition in Beginning Literacy

Synopsis

This edited volume grew out of a conference that brought together beginning reading experts from the fields of education and the psychology of reading and reading disabilities so that they could present and discuss their research findings and theories about how children learn to read words, instructional contexts that facilitate this learning, background experiences prior to formal schooling that contribute, and sources of difficulty in disabled readers. The chapters bring a variety of perspectives to bear on a single cluster of problems involving the acquisition of word reading ability. It is the editors' keen hope that the insights and findings of the research reported here will influence and become incorporated into the development of practicable, classroom-based instructional programs that succeed in improving children's ability to become skilled readers. Furthermore, they hope that these insights and findings will become incorporated into the working knowledge that teachers apply when they teach their students to read, and into further research on reading acquisition.

Excerpt

This edited volume grew out of a conference sponsored by the National Reading Research Center, funded through the Office of Educational Research and Improvement by the U.S. Department of Education. The purpose of the conference was to bring together beginning reading experts from the fields of education and the psychology of reading and reading disabilities so that they could present and discuss their research findings and theories about how children learn to read words, instructional contexts that facilitate this learning, background experiences prior to formal schooling that contribute, and sources of difficulty in disabled readers. Presenters wrote drafts of their chapters prior to the meeting; these were read by others and discussed at the meeting, and revisions were written to produce this volume.

Chapters in Part I focus on the importance of the internal cognitive processes of developing readers and on explanations of their growth and development. Authors in Part II of the book address the development of reading-related phonological skills in disabled readers and programs aimed at teaching disabled readers. Chapters in Part III present studies of word recognition in the context of the early home environment, and also examine several beginning reading programs in the classroom. Also, the principles that make early literacy instruction motivating to students are addressed, and the impact of early reading success on later reading habits are examined.

Ehri (chap. 1) begins by identifying the processes that develop as beginners learn to recognize written words. Ehri considers the different ways that words might be read and proposes a detailed developmental model, including the role of alphabetic processes and spelling knowledge in acquiring mature word recognition skills. Ehri emphasizes that although a method of instruction is not prescribed herein, it is paramount to take into consideration the cognitive and linguistic processes to be targeted in such instruction.

Goswami examines the importance of spelling patterns that correspond to rhymes in the spoken language on children's reading acquisition (chap. 2). She argues that the high level of regularity of orthographic analogies at the rhyme level, as well as children's early sensitivity to rhymes in spoken English, combine to make . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.