Framing Pieces: Designs of the Gloss in Joyce, Woolf, and Pound

Framing Pieces: Designs of the Gloss in Joyce, Woolf, and Pound

Framing Pieces: Designs of the Gloss in Joyce, Woolf, and Pound

Framing Pieces: Designs of the Gloss in Joyce, Woolf, and Pound

Synopsis

In Framing Pieces, Whittier-Ferguson recovers and explores drafts, notes, glosses, essays, and guides that high modernists, such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound generated in order to interpret their own work. These archival materials reveal a complex picture of how texts like Finnegan's Wake, A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, and ABC's of Reading were annotated and framed by their authors, and how the authors illuminated and obscured various aspects of the annotations. Whittier-Ferguson also examines the first editions and periodicals in which these works appeared to show how modernist writers gauged the extent of their audience and tried to control their readers' encounters with their writing.

Excerpt

As the book goes out into a larger, a more varied audience these
influences become more and more complex. According to its wealth, its
poverty, its education, its ignorance, the public demands what satisfies
its own need--poetry, history, instruction, a story to make them forget
their own drab lives. the thing that the writer has to say becomes
increasingly cumbered.

Virginia Woolf, Anon

Joyce's most flamboyant, entirely overt display of apparatus comes in what his readers call the Lessons or the Schoolroom chapter of Finnegans Wake (II.2), a chapter heavily encumbered with marginalia and footnotes. and these pages' florid borders blossom further when we return the Lessons to transition, when we place ii.2 beside the first book devoted solely to Work in Progress: Our Exagmination Round His Factification for Incamination of Work in Progress (1929), and when we search also for the origins of these glosses in the drafts of the chapter. These additional framings perfectly suit Joyce's Lessons," since ii.2, in conjunction with its focus on rambunctious children being schooled and eluding their teachers' designs, concerns itself more generally with all readers--those unrestrained, irrepressible generators of literal and metaphorical apparatus whose interpretive and misinterpretive activity adds unpredictably to the dimensions of every text over time. I turn to the details of ii.2 only after looking at the issue of transition in which the first annotated Lessons appeared, as well as at Our Exagmination, attending to the apparatus loosely attached to Joyce's text by other hands. in addition to providing a sociopolitically relevant frame for Work in Progress transition constitutes a crucially important theater for the elaborate, elaborative production of Finnegans Wake and for many of the first exegeses of Joyce's demanding book. the published Wake displays a more narrowly circumscribed, less fully annotated version of the Lessons. . . ."

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.