From Anglo-Saxon to Early Middle English: Studies Presented to E.G. Stanley

From Anglo-Saxon to Early Middle English: Studies Presented to E.G. Stanley

From Anglo-Saxon to Early Middle English: Studies Presented to E.G. Stanley

From Anglo-Saxon to Early Middle English: Studies Presented to E.G. Stanley

Synopsis

From Anglo-Saxon to Early Middle English brings together eleven papers on aspects of English language and literature from the eighth to the thirteenth century, written in honor of E.G. Stanley, the recently retired Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon in the University of Oxford. The papers, written by eminent scholars from Britain, North America, New Zealand, and Germany, reflect the range of E.G. Stanley's work, examining philology, meter, and literary style. However, the focus of the volume is on the period of rapid change from late Anglo-Saxon to early medieval England, and the contributors consider in detail the ways in which both language and literary forms developed during this time. The volume contains a comprehensive bibliography of E.G. Stanley's publications, together with an account of his distinguished career.

Excerpt

Eric Stanley was educated at University College, Oxford, and subsequently awarded a Ph.D at Birmingham University. He was lecturer in English at Birmingham from 1951 to 1962 and then successively Reader and Professor of English in the University of London at Queen Mary College from 1962 to 1975. He was lured to Yale to become Professor of English in 1975, and lured back again to Oxford in 1977, when he took up the Rawlinson and Bosworth Chair of Anglo-Saxon, which he held until his retirement in 1991. His distinguished record as an Anglo-Saxon philologist and textual scholar, beginning with an article on 'The Chronology of r-metathesis in Old English' in 1952 and 'A note on Genesis B, 328' in 1954, has been sustained for some forty years with the same unflagging enthusiasm and sharpness; his 1956 article on 'Old English poetic diction and the interpretation of The Wanderer, The Seafarer, and The Penitent's Prayer', the collection of critical essays which he commissioned and edited as Continuations and Beginnings in 1966, and his study of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century scholarship on Anglo-Saxon, The Search for Anglo-Saxon Paganism (1975), have been particular landmarks. In recent years his scholarship and wisdom have been especially devoted to the progress of the Old English Dictionary in Toronto. But Anglo-Saxon has always been just one of his accomplishments. His publications in Middle English range from his magisterial edition of The Owl and the Nightingale in 1960 and his seminal article on 'Laʒamon's antiquarian sentiments' in 1969 to 'Directions for making many kinds of laces' (1974). As a reviewer he is indefatigable: the total number had risen to well over two hundred reviews by 1992 and the stream has continued unabated. His name is also closely associated with the quarterly periodical Notes and Queries, which he has co-edited for the last thirty years, encouraging the work of younger scholars and trimming the long-windedness of older ones. As a Fellow of the British Academy, an adviser to the University Grants Committee in Britain, and an energetic external examiner he has played a major role in fostering university scholarship in all fields of English, and his generosity with advice and help to colleagues and students has been marked. In Oxford especially his sympathetic concern for graduate students and his devotion to Pembroke College, where he served as librarian and took delight in teaching undergraduates, has made him a familiar and influential figure.

His interests and expertise range very widely and this collection of essays . . .

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