Unconquered People: Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians

Unconquered People: Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians

Unconquered People: Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians

Unconquered People: Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians

Synopsis

Explains when & how Seminole & Miccosukee culture was formed & how it has withstood historical challenges & survived in the face of pressures from the modern world.

Excerpt

Ask who the Seminole Indians are and most people would correctly identify them as Native Americans living in Florida. Many fewer would know that significant numbers of Seminole Indians also live in Oklahoma or that individuals of Seminole ancestry, like other Americans, reside in small towns and large urban centers from New York City to the Bay Area in California. Even fewer would be aware of the history of the Seminoles, who once lived in isolation in southern Florida but today run a sophisticated and instructional page on the World Wide Web and maintain their equally educational museum.

In this popularly written and well-illustrated volume, anthropologist Brent Weisman brings fresh perspectives to the Seminoles, explaining how they emerged as an ethnic group during the colonial period. He also relates that history to the rich legacy of the precolumbian Indians of the southeastern United States. Weisman, a friend to the Seminoles as well as a scholar of their culture, leads us through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the present, weaving together the historical and archaeological sources that allow us to understand the changes that took place in Seminole lifeways even while these resilient people retained the core of their identity and heritage. Past and present, traditional and new--all blend together in the modern Seminole and Miccosukee Indians.

Miccosukee Indians? Who are they? As Weisman explains, the Miccosukee, another modern-day South Florida tribe, share a history and close ties to the Seminoles. It was the politics of the mid-twentieth century that resulted in the formation of two separate federally recognized groups, the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the Miccosukee Tribe.

In a concluding chapter that readers will find especially refreshing, Weisman provides an annotated atlas of the sites and places they can visit . . .

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