Race Relations and the Race Problem: A Definition and an Analysis

Race Relations and the Race Problem: A Definition and an Analysis

Race Relations and the Race Problem: A Definition and an Analysis

Race Relations and the Race Problem: A Definition and an Analysis

Excerpt

To those who reflect on the general course of events it is always likely to seem as if we had reached a critical period in our history. This is especially true of the present period. When we reflect on the events and trends of the last score of years, it is easy to understand why competent students have so often said that at no time in its history has the South approached a period more critical than the period into which it, along with the rest of the world, appears to be moving. We seem to have reached, or to be approaching, a dividing line in the history of this section and of the nation.

We used to think of the South somewhat as we have thought of the Orient, as an area that was culturally passive, where the States were not really States but neighborhoods, and where life was predominantly rural and personal. We thought of it as the region of the United States which had retained a stronger sense of tradition than the more restless, industrialized parts of the country. Life in the South seemed to dispose people to cultivate a certain spirit of acceptance, and to assume that what had always been would always be.

The South was predominantly agricultural, and the large plantation estate defined status and success and a way of life for the Southern farmer. It was a land of "open resources" where living was relatively easy, so easy, in fact, that planters and employers were led to compete with each other for laborers and to adopt various methods of compulsion to hold on the job the laborers they got.

But now the situation seems reversed, or in process of reversal. Manufacturing industry has grown up in the South, or has moved in from the North, and the chances are that there is more to come. With industrialization has come urbanization. Not only whites but Negroes also are moving away from the areas where they originally were planted.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.