American Diplomacy in a New Era

American Diplomacy in a New Era

American Diplomacy in a New Era

American Diplomacy in a New Era

Excerpt

The Committee on International Relations decided some years ago to sponsor conferences and publish a symposium on the general role of diplomacy in the mid-20th century. Diplomacy in a Changing World, published in 1959, was the outcome of this effort. When the project was nearing completion it became clear that problems of American diplomacy since the Second World War have been so complex that there should be a second volume dealing specifically with them.

The present volume is, then, a modest endeavor to clarify the course of American diplomacy since 1945--its major objectives, and problems of formulating and implementing them. Part One examines major foreign policy issues, together with diplomacy involving specific areas. Part Two deals with policy-making and organizational problems. Part Three offers thoughts about the future. All the contributors to this volume are American scholars with the exception of Professor J. B. Duroselle, who appraises the virtues and shortcomings of American diplomacy through the eyes of a Frenchman.

While this second volume gathers important material and analyzes some crucial problems of American diplomacy, it is not all-inclusive. Other aspects of American foreign policy and diplomacy will appear in monographs to be published by the Committee.

The editorial task was greatly facilitated by the exemplary cooperation of all contributors. In the early stage of the volume I benefited from the wise counsel of Professor M. A. Fitzsimons of the University of Notre Dame, but to my sorrow he was unable to participate in the editorial work for reasons of health. Special thanks go to my friend of many years, Professor Robert H. Ferrellof Indiana University, who acted as editorial consultant. He read all the manuscripts and his comments and suggestions were most helpful for the solution of problems inherent in a collective work. I am grateful to my research assistants, and particularly to John Crutcher who participated in the editorial work with zeal and deep curiosity. Bernard . . .

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