Organized Labor and the Mexican Revolution under Lazaro Cardenas

Organized Labor and the Mexican Revolution under Lazaro Cardenas

Organized Labor and the Mexican Revolution under Lazaro Cardenas

Organized Labor and the Mexican Revolution under Lazaro Cardenas

Excerpt

Of the historic struggles of peripheral, colonial countries to overcome the difficulties imposed upon them by economic imperialism from without and economic liberalism from within, none is more moving than the Mexican battle during the CU+00EOrdenas era of the Mexican Revolution (1934-40) for the attainment of national sovereignty and a greater degree of economic independence. It is unquestionably true that "the government of Lázaro Cárdenas was the culminating moment of the Mexican Revolution." In this new national statecraft, "...the trade union became an instrument for the reduction of power of private industry and for making the state the arbiter of the nation's economy." At the same time, the labor movement exercised considerable power in national policy, thus becoming one of the principal agents of the state as workers achieved a more significant position in the evolution of Mexican social and economic life. There is a close parallel between the co-operation of organized labor and the chief executive in both Mexico and the United States during this period. A similar partnership was formed in Argentina a few years later.

The unique combination of the program of Mexican labor, the policies of the Cárdenas government, and the response of property . . .

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