Studies in the Constitutional History of Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries

Studies in the Constitutional History of Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries

Studies in the Constitutional History of Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries

Studies in the Constitutional History of Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries

Excerpt

The following essays are an attempt to discuss, from a very general point of view, some of the most familiar problems of thirteenth and fourteenth century constitutional history. Perhaps an apology is needed for such an attempt. There will be many sins of error and omission. It is hardly possible, over such a period, to make an intimate acquaintance even with the printed, much less with the unprinted material. I am, and have been, acutely aware of the limitations this imposes on the value of the work and on the truth of the generalisations I have ventured to make. There is hardly an episode of importance in the whole period which does not offer clear opportunities for further research. Yet, perhaps, there is still a place for a survey which will concern itself with the whole rather than with a part. There is an evident danger in the increasing multiplication of texts and monographs, which tend to leave the more obvious and important problems on one side. Questionable theories have a habit of perpetuating themselves, built solidly into the structure of specialist research. The present essays have grown out of my teaching work, where the general view still is, or ought to be, important. They are a duty I have owed to my students, if not to myself, and I should like to recall here the friendly co-operation of successive years of students in discussing the major points. They are intended, taken together, to present a point of view, an interpretation of the thirteenth and fourteenth century constitution, which, if it may not prove in the end to be acceptable, at least deserves greater attention than it has lately received. If alternative theories are not given great prominence in the pages which follow, that is because they are assumed to be sufficiently well known. As my work has progressed my respect for the great theorists of the preceding generations has steadily increased.

Though I have tried to maintain a general point of view, the essays will be found to be concerned with limited and definite problems. They are a series of problems which every teacher . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.