Through the Looking Glass: Women and Borderline Personality Disorder

Through the Looking Glass: Women and Borderline Personality Disorder

Through the Looking Glass: Women and Borderline Personality Disorder

Through the Looking Glass: Women and Borderline Personality Disorder

Synopsis

"In an innovative contribution to a crucial debate, Dana Becker turns a compassionate eye toward those women oft maligned in traditional theory & clinical practice. Her cogent analysis ... recasts responses to the limits placed upon girls & women in a culture of gender inequality." Rachel T. Hare-Mustin Author of Making a Difference "With precision & deliberation, leaving no stone unturned, Dana Becker lays out the history of BPD & the sordid history of the psychiatric profession's diagnosing of women." Sharon Lamb Author of The Trouble with Blame

Excerpt

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Women and Madness: A Historical View

The complex story of borderline personality disorder cannot be told without reference to the historical association between women and madness. By the nineteenth century, women had become the most frequent consumers of treatment for "nervous complaints" and had entered into a relationship with male physicians that was to have pervasive and enduring implications for the representation--through diagnosis--of women to themselves and to others. In the nineteenth century, as today, women absorbed a view of themselves that was strongly shaped by societal notions of what constitutes madness. The history of the association between women and madness, however, has its origins in the more primitive association made between women and evil.

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