The Life and Times of Lucrezia Borgia

The Life and Times of Lucrezia Borgia

The Life and Times of Lucrezia Borgia

The Life and Times of Lucrezia Borgia

Excerpt

FROM HIS ROYAL seat at Naples, King Ferrante of Aragon had watched with uneasiness the festivities celebrating the alliance between the Sforzas and the Pope. He had sent no ambassadors to the Vatican. When the Count of Pesaro informed him of his wedding with Lucrezia, he had answered merely with an official note. In the hope of getting his own back, he waited anxiously for news from Diego Lopez de Haro, the ambassador whom Ferdinand the Catholic of Spain had sent at his request to Rome with extensive powers and the avowed intention of lodging complaints and threatening the Head of the Church.

The Catholic King's interest in the reigning House of Naples, on which Diego Lopez laid much emphasis, soon began to have a visible effect on the attitude of the Pontiff, who began to look on the House of Aragon with a more friendly eye. As soon as this good news reached Naples, the King thought he should make good his advantage by dispatching his son Federico to Rome to renew a proposal to marry Jofre into his House (for it was known by now that Cesare was to be made a Cardinal, omnino cardinalabitur), and to persuade Alexander VI to abandon the alliance against the Kingdom of Naples. Federico found the Pope well-disposed towards him and managed to conclude a marriage agreement for the Pope's youngest son. At that time Jofre Borgia was not yet twelve years old but, in the words of the Florentine ambassador, 'was truly handsome and of pleasing aspect'. A questionmark, however, hung over his head, for the Pope had confided to his intimates and even to his not-so-intimates, that he did not think Jofre was his son though he had recognized him as such by Bull. He must have had his own private reasons for believing Jofre to be the outcome of an act of infidelity committed by Vannozza with her husband. Presumably the King of Naples was unaware of the Pope's reservation about his paternity in Jofre's case, or if he knew of it he didn't believe it, for otherwise he would never have been so pressing about marrying . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.