The Port of Hamburg

The Port of Hamburg

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The Port of Hamburg

The Port of Hamburg

Read FREE!

Excerpt

A great seaport is a country's right hand extended to foreign lands, offering them our products and requesting theirs. It is the focus of a variety of lines of communication: ocean steamship lines engaged in the coasting and the foreign trade, inland waterways and railways. Its function is to bring these lines into contact and to enable them, with the least possible friction and loss of energy, to effect the exchange of their burdens. In a seaport are knit together the bonds that unite the nations in a network of ever increasing complexity; the seaport is the highest expression of that new phenomenon of the nineteenth century: world-wide trade. It is the great clearing house for the material goods of international commerce. It is the heart of a country's commercial life, drawing off the sluggish flow of surplus inland production and sending back through the arteries of traffic the life-giving currents of foreign trade.

The first requisite for the existence of a great seaport, nowadays, is the existence of a hinterland interested in foreign trade. London is a last, waning example of the old order of seaport which throve primarily because it was the entrepôt of nations and whose business consisted mainly in transshipment and re-exportation. Today these nations have their own trade connections with lands across the sea and need no entrepôt to mediate for them. A modern port does not import for foreign countries nor does it import for itself, just as the heart does not draw . . .

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