An African Explains Apartheid

An African Explains Apartheid

An African Explains Apartheid

An African Explains Apartheid

Excerpt

The internal and external tensions generated by South Africa's racial policy have one immediate danger for mankind: They transform the second republic into a sensitive spot in a turbulent continent that is becoming increasingly involved in the Cold War. This gives rise to the very real fear that the tensions might one day get out of control and start a racial war, which could, in a flash, ignite a world conflagration. The moment it is seen from this angle, apartheid ceases to be a domestic matter for South Africa. It becomes an issue of vital importance for humanity as a whole. The problems it has created are now of such a delicate and complex nature that they call for an immediate solution, as much by the black and white South Africans as by the rest of mankind.

Between the dominant black and white groups, there now exists a legal, emotional, and psychological no man's land, to venture into which means immediate and very serious trouble. If the African tries to move into it, as the Pan-Africanist Congress attempted to do on March 21, 1960, the white authority shoots to kill. The shootings at Sharpeville, Cape Town, Durban, and Clermont Township are proof of this. If, on the other hand, the white authority provokes the Africans beyond a certain point, they, too, shoot to kill. The murder of a mixed group of policemen at Cato Manor some time back and the recent disturbances . . .

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