America's Psychologists: A Survey of a Growing Profession

America's Psychologists: A Survey of a Growing Profession

America's Psychologists: A Survey of a Growing Profession

America's Psychologists: A Survey of a Growing Profession

Excerpt

If done without vanity, it is worthwhile, from time to time, to take a critical and searching look at one's self. Such self-examination is as worthwhile for organizations and professions as for individuals, for it helps to identify major problems, to see what the members are like, to appraise the state of development of the field represented, to review educational procedures, and, in general, to try to see where the group is going and what progress it is making in getting there. When the American Psychological Association went through a major reorganization at the end of World War II, the members established a Policy and Planning Board, and instructed that board periodically to review the major problems and trends that affected psychology and psychologists.

The Policy and Planning Board decided in 1952 that it was time for a major investigation of a number of interrelated questions of psychological personnel, education, and employment, and an appraisal of the state of development of the science of psychology. Happily, the National Science Foundation agreed upon the desirability of such a study, and granted funds to the American Psychological Association so that the study could be carried out.

From the very first thinking about the matter, it was apparent that the study had two distinct aspects. One, which quickly came to be known . . .

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