A Zen Wave: Basho's Haiku and Zen

A Zen Wave: Basho's Haiku and Zen

A Zen Wave: Basho's Haiku and Zen

A Zen Wave: Basho's Haiku and Zen

Excerpt

In 1950 I submitted an M.A. dissertation titled "Bashō's Haiku and Zen" to the University of Hawaii. I do not consider that work adequate today, but I learned much from writing it, and an admonition from a member of my thesis committee, Cheuk-woon Taam, stands out in my mind. He said that just because its subject is everywhere, I must be careful not to claim universal manifestation for Zen Buddhism.

Professor Taam's words are very much to the point. Zen Buddhism does not pervade the cosmos. It presents essential nature--universal mind--but it does so as a particular teaching. Confusing the specific teaching with its vast and undifferentiated subject is a trap that has caught several tigers.

About a century ago, Imakita Kōsen, an illustrious master of Engaku Monastery in Kamakura, Japan, commented on the recorded sayings of Confucius and Mencius in a collection titled Zenkai Ichiran (One Wave of the Zen Sea), in which he taught Zen by using examples from the Analects and the Doc trine of the Mean . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.