Defence in the Cold War: The Task for the Free World

Defence in the Cold War: The Task for the Free World

Defence in the Cold War: The Task for the Free World

Defence in the Cold War: The Task for the Free World

Excerpt

Five years after Hitler's war the free countries of the world are faced with the present frustration and indefinite postponement of their war aims and peace-time policies. The fear of aggression has lately become as deep and widespread as it was in 1938; the political and social unity created for resistance to the Nazi attempt to dominate and re-shape Europe has in several nations broken down under the pressure of class and group rivalries; the process of economic recovery set in motion three years ago by the Marshall Plan is threatened by the division of Western Europe from its food-producing areas in the East, by the political and social ferment in South East Asia, and by the need to divert man-power and resources to rearmament. The common peril has drawn together the Western nations of the Continent--the sole exception is Spain --with the peoples of North America and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth. Held together though they now are by common plans, by a whole new structure of organizations and committees for political, economic, and military consultation, they have suddenly realized how unready they are to face the new threats of Communist imperialism created by a war that has radically changed the Power relationships of Europe and Asia.

Ten years ago the challenge came from Central Europe and from the Far East in what then seemed a familiar and conventional form--the form of German and Japanese militarism, backed by peoples organized and indoctrinated for war and expansion. The spirit of these two nations was reactionary and against it were combined--after much faltering and delay--all the progressive elements of the free world, ranging from the liberalism of the Americans to the disciplined zeal of the Communists in the French Resistance. Now, with Germany and Japan disarmed and occupied, with Britain and France weakened, the challenge comes from the fusion of two political forces: the traditional Russian urge to expand to the sea-coasts of the land-mass that is dominated by the Soviet Union, and the burning desire of the world-wide Communist Party . . .

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