Lectures on the History of Philosophy - Vol. 2

Lectures on the History of Philosophy - Vol. 2

Lectures on the History of Philosophy - Vol. 2

Lectures on the History of Philosophy - Vol. 2

Synopsis

G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831), the influential German philosopher, believed that human history was advancing spiritually and morally according to God's purpose.

Excerpt

The development of philosophic science an science, and, further, the progress from the Socratic point of view to the scientific, begins with Plato and is completed by Aristotle. They of a others deserve to be called teachers of the human race.

A. plato.

Plato, who must be numbered among the Socratics, was the most renowned of the friends and disciples of Socrates, and he it was who grasped in all its truth Socrates' great principle that ultimate reality lies in consciousness, since, according to him, the absolute is in thought, and all reality is Thought. He does not understand by this a one-sided thought, nor what is understood by the false idealism which makes thought once more stop aside and contemplate itself as conscious thought, and as in opposition to reality; it is the thought which embraces in an absolute unity reality as well as thinking, the Notion and its reality in the movement of science, as the Idea of a scientific whole. While Socrates had comprehended the thought which is existent in and for itself, only as an object for self-conscious will, Plato forsook this narrow point of view, and brought the merely abstract right of self--conscious thought, which Socrates had . . .

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