My Daughter, the Teacher: Jewish Teachers in the New York City Schools

My Daughter, the Teacher: Jewish Teachers in the New York City Schools

My Daughter, the Teacher: Jewish Teachers in the New York City Schools

My Daughter, the Teacher: Jewish Teachers in the New York City Schools

Synopsis

The teachers Markowitz interviewed often agree with the assessment others have made that the 1930s were in their own way a golden age in the schools. The retired teachers remember the difficult times, but also their love of teaching and the difference they made in the classrooms. Their energy, intiative, and drive will help inspire teachers today, who face the serious problems of drugs, teenage pregnancy, and violence in the classrooms.

Excerpt

A woman, strolling down a street, meets a friend who is holding her two small children by the hand.

FIRST WOMAN: "What darling children! How old are they?

SECOND WOMAN: "My son, the doctor, is four, and my daughter, the teacher, is two.

Variation on an American joke

THE MOTHER IN THIS JOKE could only be Jewish, for "my son, the doctor" and "my daughter, the teacher" were among the most cherished phrases of Jewish immigrant parents, according to many observers of New York City's Eastern European Jewish community. This symbolizes the expectation of this group that the children's reach would exceed their parents', and illustrates how these two professions represented the pinnacle of immigrant parents' aspirations for their Americanized offspring. Supposedly, the attainment of these goals personifies the exceptionally successful socioeconomic adaptation of Jewish immigrants in . . .

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