Magritte

Magritte

Magritte

Magritte

Excerpt

"There is no Surrealist art," Georges Hugnet once wrote, calling attention to the fact that Surrealism is not a style nor a method of painting but an effort to restore to man through any means possible the consciousness of his interior world where the objects of sense unite with meaning. Serving this purpose, form is not created to delight the eye but to stimulate the mind to recognize itself and the hidden range of its activity.

The basis of the surreal is the exact antithesis of the persistent popular tradition that describes all experience in terms of distinct "objective" and "subjective" worlds. In the art of the Surrealist the "objective" world refuses to remain a separate realm but actively unites with our imagination to break down the confining walls of this simple rational deceit, freeing the mind to invest the world of sense with its own complex meanings. In consequence, we look with fresh eyes upon the objects of space and with new comprehension on the mysterious expanse of our minds. And in this new unity there is peculiar satisfaction.

In this general sense, although long ago he ceased to follow many of the theories of the Paris group, René Margitte is a Surrealist. His paintings are, for the most part, relentlessly logical, so relentless that they destroy logic itself by showing how poor an agent it is for comprehending either sensory perception or the images of the mind. Each painting in its own way makes one aware of a visual problem, an illusive idea, a provocative image which seems transparently simple |in statement, yet remains active as a problem. Because his images . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.