The First Lady Chatterley

The First Lady Chatterley

The First Lady Chatterley

The First Lady Chatterley

Excerpt

From when I first knew him, Lawrence wanted to write what he called a romantic novel, a picaresque novel. I don't quite know what that is. All his life, he wanted to write "Lady Chatterley's Lover."

Only an Englishman or a New Englander could have written it. It is the last word in Puritanism. Other races have marriage too, but the Mediterraneans seem to have Homer's ancient pattern still of the faithful Penelope at home, but the man wanders off after Circes and Calypsos --to come home again to his Penelope when he has wandered enough; she is always there for him. The French have "I'amour," the Americans their easy and quick divorces and so on, but only the English have this special brand of marriage. It is not the bonds of interests, or comradeship or even children, but the God-given unity of marriage. England's greatness was largely based on her profound conception of marriage, and that is part of Puritanism.

Lawrence was scared when he wrote "Lady Chatterley." She was written in the Tuscan Hills in an umbrella pinewood. Not far from where he sat under a large umbrella pine was the sanctuary of San Eusebio. He had a large slab of stone for his bed in a small cave and a smaller slab of stone for his table and a nice little spring nearby. It was an enchanting place where Lawrence went to write every day, especially in Spring. He had to walk a little way by the olive trees to get to his umbrella pine. Thyme and mint tufts grew along the path and purple anemones and wild gladioli and carpets of violets and myrtle shrubs. White, calm oxen were plowing.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.