National Interest/ National Honor: The Diplomacy of the Falklands Crisis

National Interest/ National Honor: The Diplomacy of the Falklands Crisis

National Interest/ National Honor: The Diplomacy of the Falklands Crisis

National Interest/ National Honor: The Diplomacy of the Falklands Crisis

Synopsis

The Falklands crisis of 1982 offers several distinct but interrelated case studies in negotiation and third-party mediation of international conflict. This book is essentially a chronological study of the origins and nature of that crisis and of the accompanying attempts at settlement. Kinney discusses Argentine and British politics, the actual Argentine invasion, and the diplomatic decisionmaking involved. The book includes interviews, not available in any other source, with diplomats and officials involved in the crisis.

Excerpt

The Falklands crisis of spring 1982 offers several distinct but interrelated case studies in negotiation and third-party mediation of international conflict. Attempts at averting or moderating war ran the full gamut from bilateral negotiations and General Assembly resolutions to third-party and Security Council "preventative diplomacy" via classic American shuttle diplomacy by the Secretary of State, an attempt at settlement by Peru, and, finally, the extended negotiations under the auspices of the Secretary General of the United Nations.

Each of these efforts was itself a textbook example of peacemaking. The two parties negotiated for a decade and a half. After the first use of force, the peacemakers had weeks, indeed months, to avert bloodshed--a thousand hours between the landings of Argentine and then British warriors.

Nonetheless war came, as it has more than 200 times since 1945. The roots of armed conflict lay in centuries of territorial dispute of the kind that pervades the modern world (especially the New World), leading to less and less inhibited resort to force by nation-states. The conflict was also rooted in British representational democracy, politics, defense, and worldview; the particular nature of Argentine history and the pace of her politics; in the inconsistency and unreality (abetted by the radical nonaligned states) which is the field of U.N. political activity called Decolonization; and in the mutual, longer-run failure of political and diplomatic imagination and courage on the part of both parties, their friends, and the nation-state system.

The diplomacy of the Falklands crisis includes several major stages:

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